The King and Queen attend the reopening of the Royal Armoury

The King during the opening ceremony outside the Royal Armoury on Slottsbacken.

The King during the opening ceremony outside the Royal Armoury on Slottsbacken. Photo: Emma Fredriksson/The Royal Court of Sweden

On Monday 17 June, The King and Queen visited the Royal Armoury. During their visit, The King and Queen learnt about the new standard exhibition, which presents a chronological narrative of Sweden's royal history.

The Royal Armoury's permanent exhibition has been closed for a number of years for renovations and to enable new research and knowledge to be highlighted.

The King reopened the standard exhibition, which describes the royal history of Sweden from King Gustav Vasa to the present Royal Family.

The King studies a stand featuring clothing worn by King Gustaf V (1858-1950) and Queen Viktoria (1862-1930). Photo: Emma Fredriksson/The Royal Court of Sweden

The King and Queen and Minister Amanda Lind in front of King Gustav III (1746-1792) and Queen Sofia Magdalena's (1746-1813) wedding garments from 1766. Photo: Emma Fredriksson/The Royal Court of Sweden

The tour

Together with Minister for Culture and Democracy Amanda Lind, The King and Queen were given a tour of the exhibition and its many objects by Museum Director Malin Grundberg and officials Sofia Nestor and Andreas Olsson.

The Royal Armoury is a state historic museum, and has been located in the vaults of the Royal Palace since 1978. Photo: Emma Fredriksson/The Royal Court of Sweden

The opening ceremony

The tour was followed by an opening ceremony outside the museum. The King gave a speech, in which he said:

"Bringing 500 years of royal history to life is no small feat. The new exhibition has involved a great deal of work. And I hope that it will attract many visitors of all ages."

The King then cut a ribbon to reopen the Royal Armoury's new standard exhibition.

About the Royal Armoury

The Royal Armoury was originally the Royal Court's storeroom for garments, equipment and weapons. In 1628, King Gustav II Adolf decided that the clothing he had worn during the military campaigns in Poland should be preserved in the Royal Armoury for posterity, laying the foundation for today's museum.

Over the centuries, weapons and objects such as ceremonial attire, equestrian caparisons and carriages have been transferred from the Royal Court to the Royal Armoury.

The Royal Armoury is part of the National Historical Museums.