The Crown Princess celebrates Gothenburg's 400th anniversary

The Crown Princess's speech from Logården, below the Royal Palace.

The Crown Princess's speech from Logården, below the Royal Palace. Photo: Sara Friberg/The Royal Court of Sweden

On Friday 4 June, The Crown Princess, Duchess of Västergötland, took part in the digital celebrations for Gothenburg's 400th anniversary.

The anniversary was marked with an official ceremony led by Tomas von Brömmsen. During the ceremony, The Crown Princess addressed the city. In her speech, The Crown Princess said:

"Dear people of Gothenburg. You are well known for being proud of your city. And with good reason! So much of what has formed Sweden, built our prosperity and characterised our culture has come from you. And this is still the case today: Gothenburg plays – and will continue to play – an important role in Sweden's development."

Chair of the Municipal Council Anneli Rhedin and County Governor Anders Danielsson also gave speeches. Salutes were then fired at 16:21.

The main celebrations have been postponed until 2023.

Find out more about Gothenburg's 400th anniversary celebrations here External link, opens in new window..

Town charter granted in 1621

Gothenburg was awarded its town charter on 4 June 1621 by King Gustav II Adolf. King Gustav II Adolf and The Crown Princess share many family ties. For example, the king – whose statue now stands on Gustav Adolf's Square in Gothenburg – was half-brother of The Crown Princess's great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandmother.

Photograph of Gustav Adolf's Square and the city's 300th anniversary celebrations. The 300th anniversary was also postponed, and was celebrated in 1923. The photograph shows Fogelberg's statue of King Gustav II Adolf, the city's founder, to the left.

Photograph of Gustav Adolf's Square and the city's 300th anniversary celebrations. The 300th anniversary was also postponed, and was celebrated in 1923. The photograph shows Fogelberg's statue of King Gustav II Adolf, the city's founder, to the left. Photo from the Bernadotte Library's image archive.